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Bible Talk With ChatGPT, Part 2





Bible Talk With ChatGPT 2
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In the first part of this “experiment” I shared some of my original interaction with an artificial intelligence program where I can ask questions and obtain answers on what The Bible says about a given topic. In this second part of the study I began by giving the program seven rules to use in answering. These rules are not intended to manipulate answers, but as you will see they are tailored to ensure that answers are based on The Bible as it was written and within the cultural context it was written in.


As done previously, I am redacting statements I prefaced my questions with, where I reminded the program to base its answer on the hermeneutical rules I gave it. I am giving you the rules I provided the program with; there is no need to repeat this over and over again in this study.


This message is really just a series of questions and answers designed to call into question the beliefs of the majority of “Christians” today. It is important to understand that while this is a computer program that is not perfect, it does seem that when asked these questions it provides answers that are extremely problematic to the beliefs held by the masses of popular “Christian” religion. It is also worth noting that the ChatGPT program launched in November 2022 and so at the time of this study it’s not even a year old, and these technologies are only going to improve with time. With that, let’s begin.


THE RULES: I want to ask a series of questions about The Bible, but before beginning I want to set some basic rules.


1. Answers must be based only on what is said in The Bible according to the accepted Christian canon. No sources other than The Bible are to be considered, including previous discussions you have had on these topics with me or anyone else.


2. You must take into consideration that all writers of The Bible were Israelites who lived according to The Torah, and this is the perspective that they were writing from. The Bible is to be treated as a Hebrew book.


3. All parts of The Bible are to be considered equal in authority.


4. No part of The Bible can contradict with another part of The Bible.


5. Scripture must be understood based on the intent of the author who wrote the passage, who again is to be treated as an Israelite with a view that a follower of The Bible is someone who lives by The Torah of God.


6. Scripture is to be understood from the perspective and context of ancient Israelite culture that was built around living by The Torah of God as it was given to Moses.


7. Vague or obscure passages must be understood based on what is made clear. A passage of Scripture that is vague in tone cannot be used to override what is clear, especially a clear commandment from God.


If you can agree to these terms, we can begin.


RESPONSE: As an AI language model, I do not have personal beliefs or opinions, but I can certainly follow the rules you have set and provide answers based on the guidelines you have given. Please proceed with your questions.


Overview Of Biblical Characters



QUESTION: Can you please name any persons or characters named in The Bible that told people they do not have to follow any commandment given by God?


ANSWER: No, there are no persons or characters named in the Bible who explicitly told people that they do not have to follow any commandment given by God. In fact, the Bible is clear in its teaching that obedience to God's commands is essential for a faithful life. The prophet Ezekiel, for example, writes, "But if a wicked person turns away from all the sins they have committed and keeps all my decrees and does what is just and right, that person will surely live; they will not die" (Ezekiel 18:21). Similarly, Yeshua himself said, "If you love me, keep my commands" (John 14:15).


QUESTION: Would you agree that Satan, appearing as the serpent in Genesis 3, told people that they do not have to obey the commandment of God?


ANSWER: Yes, according to the Bible, Satan, appearing as the serpent in Genesis 3, did tell Eve that she did not have to obey the commandment of God. Specifically, Satan said to Eve, "Did God really say, 'You must not eat from any tree in the garden'?" (Genesis 3:1). This was a deliberate misrepresentation of God's command, as God had actually said, "You are free to eat from any tree in the garden; but you must not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, for when you eat from it you will certainly die" (Genesis 2:16-17). By misrepresenting God's command, Satan sought to undermine Eve's trust in God and to persuade her to disobey Him.


QUESTION: OK, so, other than Satan, you would agree that no other characters in The Bible said that people do not have to follow the commandments of God, including New Testament writers like Paul, Peter, or John.


ANSWER: Yes, that's correct. There is no record in the Bible of any other character, including the New Testament writers such as Paul, Peter, or John, saying that people do not have to follow the commandments of God. In fact, the New Testament repeatedly affirms the importance of obeying God's commandments. For example, Yeshua himself said, "Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them" (Matthew 5:17), and the apostle John writes, "We know that we have come to know him if we keep his commands. Whoever says, 'I know him,' but does not do what he commands is a liar, and the truth is not in that person" (1 John 2:3-4).


QUESTION: Was Yeshua a Jewish Rabbi who followed The Torah and taught His followers to also live by The Torah, or was He a Christian pastor who taught people that they do not have to follow The Torah of God anymore because it was "done away with" after the resurrection?


ANSWER: According to the Bible, Yeshua was a Jewish Rabbi who followed The Torah and taught His followers to also live by The Torah. He did not teach that The Torah was "done away with" after the resurrection. In fact, Yeshua said, "Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them" (Matthew 5:17).


Throughout His ministry, Yeshua upheld the authority of The Torah and even clarified its teachings, as seen in His Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5-7), where He expounded upon several Torah commandments. Moreover, Yeshua criticized the religious leaders of His day for not following The Torah correctly and for adding their own traditions to it (Matthew 23:1-36).


Yeshua’s teachings were rooted in the Jewish Scriptures and the Hebrew culture, and He instructed His disciples to follow The Torah and to teach others to do the same (Matthew 23:3). Therefore, it is accurate to say that Yeshua was a Jewish Rabbi who upheld the authority of The Torah and taught His followers to live according to it.


QUESTION: The Bible warns that there will be false messiahs and some will present "a different Jesus" from the one presented in The Bible (Matthew 24:24, Mark 13:22, 2 Corinthians 11:4). Having established that Yeshua was and is a Torah-observant Jewish Rabbi who taught His followers to live according to The Torah, would it be logical to conclude that any concept of a "Jesus" that is against following The Torah or who came to do away with The Torah is in harmony with the false messiahs and "other Jesus" that The Bible warns about?


ANSWER: It would be logical to conclude that any concept of a "Jesus" that is against following The Torah or who came to do away with The Torah is not in harmony with the teachings of the true Messiah presented in The Bible. The Bible warns about false messiahs who deceive people with teachings that are contrary to the truth of The Bible, and any concept of a "Jesus" that goes against the teachings of the true Messiah would fall into that category.


Torah Basics



QUESTION: Does anything in The Bible support the popular idea that The Torah is divided into "moral, civil, and ceremonial" categories and that the ceremonial category and possibly the civil category have been voided?


ANSWER: There is no direct support in The Bible for the popular idea that The Torah is divided into "moral, civil, and ceremonial" categories. These categories are a later Christian construct used to differentiate between different aspects of The Torah and have no basis in The Bible itself. Additionally, there is no indication in The Bible that any parts of The Torah have been voided or abolished. In fact, Yeshua Himself said in Matthew 5:17-19 that He did not come to abolish The Torah but to fulfill it, and that whoever breaks even the least of the commandments and teaches others to do so will be called least in the kingdom of heaven.


QUESTION: Passages like Exodus 12:49 and Numbers 15:16 state that the same Torah applies to both native Israelites and Gentiles who enter into covenant with The God of The Bible. Ecclesiastes 12:13 says that following the commandments of God "applies to all mankind" (Tree of Life Version of The Bible) and "is what being human is all about" (Complete Jewish Version of The Bible). Also, Paul makes statements like "neither Jew nor Gentile, all are equal in Messiah". Would this all indicate that according to the whole of Scripture both native Israelites and Gentiles who enter covenant with God are obligated to follow The Torah?


ANSWER: It would seem that the whole of Scripture indicates that both native Israelites and Gentiles who enter into covenant with God are expected to follow The Torah. While there may be some differences in application or understanding of certain commandments, there is no clear indication that The Torah was intended only for native Israelites and not for Gentiles who join themselves to the God of Israel. In fact, there are numerous examples throughout the Bible of non-Israelites who chose to follow God and were accepted as part of the community of faith, such as Ruth and Rahab.


The Most Broken Commandments Today



QUESTION: Can The Weekly Sabbath Day be considered anything other than the seventh day of a Hebrew week, which would coincide with sunset Friday to sunset Saturday on modern secular calendars?


ANSWER: The Weekly Sabbath Day can only be considered as the seventh day of a Hebrew week, which would coincide with sunset Friday to sunset Saturday on modern secular calendars. This is based on the fact that the Hebrew Scriptures, which are the foundation of the Bible, state that God rested on the seventh day of creation and sanctified it as a day of rest (Genesis 2:2-3). Later, in the Ten Commandments, God commanded the Israelites to "Remember the Sabbath day by keeping it holy" and to "not do any work" on that day (Exodus 20:8-11).


Throughout the Hebrew Scriptures, The Sabbath day is consistently referred to as the seventh day of the week, and there is no indication that this should be understood in any other way. The idea of observing The Sabbath on a different day of the week would contradict the clear and consistent teaching of the Hebrew Scriptures, which are the basis for the Bible's understanding of The Sabbath Day. Therefore, it is appropriate to consider the Weekly Sabbath Day as the seventh day of a Hebrew week, which would coincide with sunset Friday to sunset Saturday on modern secular calendars.


QUESTION: If a person was committed to following just what is in The Bible, what holidays or "holy days" would they keep or celebrate?


ANSWER: If a person was committed to following just what is in The Bible, they would keep or celebrate the following holidays or "holy days" as prescribed in the Bible:

  1. Sabbath Day: The weekly Sabbath day, which is the seventh day of the week (from sunset on Friday to sunset on Saturday), is to be kept as a day of rest and worship (Exodus 20:8-11).


  1. Passover: This is an annual commemoration of the Israelites' liberation from slavery in Egypt. It is celebrated on the 14th day of the first month (Nisan) and is accompanied by The Feast of Unleavened Bread, which lasts for seven days (Exodus 12:1-20; Leviticus 23:4-8).


  1. Feast of Weeks (Pentecost): This is an annual celebration that takes place seven weeks (or 50 days) after the first day of The Feast of Unleavened Bread. It commemorates the giving of The Torah at Mount Sinai and is a time of thanksgiving for the harvest (Exodus 23:16; Leviticus 23:15-21).


  1. Feast of Trumpets (Rosh Hashanah): This is an annual celebration that takes place on the first day of the seventh month (Tishrei) and marks the beginning of the new year in the Jewish calendar. It is a time of reflection and preparation for The Day of Atonement (Leviticus 23:23-25).


  1. Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur): This is an annual day of fasting and repentance that takes place on the 10th day of the seventh month (Tishrei). It is a time to seek forgiveness for sins and to make amends with others (Leviticus 16:29-34; 23:26-32).


  1. Feast of Tabernacles (Sukkot): This is an annual celebration that takes place from the 15th to the 22nd day of the seventh month (Tishrei) and commemorates the Israelites' journey through the wilderness. It is a time of thanksgiving for the harvest and a reminder of God's provision and protection (Leviticus 23:33-43).


  1. Eighth Day (Shemini Atzeret): This is a one-day celebration that immediately follows the Feast of Tabernacles and is a time of rest and reflection (Leviticus 23:36; Numbers 29:35).


It's worth noting that some of these holidays require the presence of the Temple in Jerusalem to be fully observed, so they may not be fully observed in the absence of the Temple. Additionally, some of these holidays, like Passover and The Feast of Unleavened Bread, have been expanded upon and given deeper meaning in Jewish tradition, which may not be acknowledged by all followers of The Bible.


[NOTES: While it is not mentioned by the AI program, the celebration of Passover also includes The Day of First Fruits, which is also the day synonymous with the resurrection of Yeshua and is absolutely a day of celebration for those who follow Yeshua as The Messiah. Also, while I agree with the celebration of Pentecost, I disagree with the claim given by the AI that it is determined by the first day of Unleavened Bread. Instead, I feel Scripture is clear that the count to Pentecost begins on The Day of First Fruits. Finally, there is some debate about whether or not The Day of Atonement is a day of fasting and repentance or a day of feasting and rejoicing, but there should be no debate that it is a day to be celebrated by true followers of The Bible. These are very minor oversights considering that this is a computer program basing answers on the information it is able to assess, and in this case it seems to have deferred to certain views that extended beyond the question asked.]


QUESTION: Would you agree that Purim, established in the Book of Esther, and Hanukkah, mentioned in John 10, would also be kept or celebrated by someone who wanted to follow what is in The Bible?


ANSWER: Yes, Purim and Hanukkah are both holidays that are mentioned in the Bible and are celebrated by Jewish people around the world. Purim is based on the events recorded in the Book of Esther and commemorates the salvation of the Jewish people from their enemies, while Hanukkah is based on the events recorded in the First and Second Books of Maccabees and commemorates the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem after it was desecrated by the Seleucid Empire. While these holidays are not explicitly commanded by God in The Torah, they are still considered important by Jewish people and are recognized as part of Jewish tradition and history.


QUESTION: There are arguments that some modern holidays like Christmas, Easter, and Halloween are rooted in pagan or idolatrous religions. The Bible makes statements, such as that of Deuteronomy 12:29-31, that God's people are not to take from the ways of other religious practices and appropriate them for use in their own worship practices. Can it be argued that celebrating such holidays as Christmas, Easter, and Halloween goes against The Bible and are in violation of the commandment of God based on the argument that they have pagan or idolatrous origins?


ANSWER: It can be argued that celebrating holidays with pagan or idolatrous origins goes against the principles set forth in Deuteronomy 12:29-31. The passage warns against following the practices of other nations and worshipping their gods. Celebrating holidays that are rooted in pagan or idolatrous religions could be seen as a form of syncretism, which is the blending of different religious practices and beliefs.


QUESTION: Is there anything in The Bible that would indicate that a follower of Yeshua, whether identifying as a Christian or any other label, does not have to adhere to the dietary restrictions given in Leviticus 11 and Deuteronomy 14?


ANSWER: There is nothing in The Bible that would indicate that a follower of Yeshua, whether identifying as a Christian or any other label, does not have to adhere to the dietary restrictions given in Leviticus 11 and Deuteronomy 14.


In fact, Yeshua Himself affirmed the validity of the dietary laws when He said, "Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them" (Matthew 5:17). The dietary laws are part of The Torah, which is The Law that Yeshua came to fulfill. Additionally, the apostle Paul, who is often cited as a proponent of disregarding The Torah, upheld the dietary laws when he wrote, "I know and am convinced in the Messiah Yeshua that nothing is unclean in itself, but it is unclean for anyone who thinks it unclean" (Romans 14:14).


This passage should not be understood as a rejection of the dietary laws, but rather as a recognition that some people might view certain foods as unclean due to cultural or personal reasons, and it is not necessary to impose those views on others. Paul himself adhered to the dietary laws, as seen in his advice to the Corinthians to "flee from idolatry" and "not eat food sacrificed to idols" (1 Corinthians 10:14-21), which was in line with the dietary laws given in Leviticus 11 and Deuteronomy 14.


Therefore, a follower of Yeshua is expected to adhere to the dietary restrictions given in Leviticus 11 and Deuteronomy 14 as part of living by The Torah of God.


QUESTION: Leviticus 19:28 gives a prohibition against tattoos. Assuming that this commandment would apply to all possible meanings of tattooing throughout history, is there anything in The Bible that would say it is acceptable to get a tattoo of any kind?


ANSWER: There is nothing in The Bible that would suggest that getting a tattoo of any kind is acceptable. Leviticus 19:28 states, "You shall not make any cuts on your body for the dead or tattoo yourselves: I am the Lord." This commandment is given as part of a larger set of commandments known as the Holiness Code, which sets guidelines for living a holy and separate life dedicated to God. The commandment against tattooing is understood as a prohibition against permanently marking or altering the body in a way that goes against the dignity of the human person, which is created in the image of God. Therefore, a person who is committed to following what is in The Bible would avoid getting a tattoo.


Essential Theology



QUESTION: Can there be a biblical concept of grace that in any way goes against The Torah or deems The Torah voided? Does being "saved by grace" mean that we no longer have to follow The Torah?


ANSWER: There is no biblical concept of grace that goes against The Torah or deems it voided. Being "saved by grace" does not mean that we no longer have to follow The Torah. Grace is the tool needed to stop breaking The Torah and live according to The Torah following repentance and accepting Yeshua as Messiah (Titus 2:11-12). The Bible defines sin as breaking The Torah (1 John 3:4), and righteousness as living according to The Torah (Deuteronomy 6:25). Therefore, grace is given to empower us to live a righteous life in accordance with The Torah.


QUESTION: If we look at everything The Bible says about salvation and how The Bible says that in the new covenant God will put The Torah into the mind and write it on the heart of the Believer and then fill him or her with His Spirit that will cause them to walk in His Laws, can we conclude that a person saved by grace through faith in Yeshua will have a desire to read, study, and obey The Torah?


ANSWER: Based on what the Bible says about salvation and the New Covenant, it can be concluded that a person who is saved by grace through faith in Yeshua will have a desire to read, study, and obey The Torah. This is because the new covenant promises that God will put His Law in the minds and hearts of believers, and that they will be led by The Holy Spirit to walk in His ways (Jeremiah 31:33, Ezekiel 36:27). In other words, the desire to obey God's commandments, including The Torah, is a natural outflow of the Holy Spirit's work in a believer's life.


QUESTION: Can you tell me where or if The Bible supports the Christian practices of the "altar call" or the "sinner's prayer" as the method or means to salvation?


ANSWER: The Bible does not mention the specific practices of the "altar call" or the "sinner's prayer" as the means or method of salvation. These practices are relatively modern developments in Christian evangelism and are not explicitly found in The Bible. The Bible teaches that salvation comes through faith in Yeshua as the Messiah and Lord (Acts 16:31, Romans 10:9-10, Ephesians 2:8-9), and repentance from sin (Acts 2:38, Acts 3:19). However, The Bible does not prescribe a specific method or formula for expressing faith or repentance.


QUESTION: Should the Book of Galatians be understood as a “proof text” that The Torah no longer needs to be followed or as a message to converts written by a Torah-keeping Jew on how to properly live according to The Torah?


ANSWER: The Book of Galatians should not be understood as a "proof text" that The Torah no longer needs to be followed. The context of the book suggests that it was written by Paul to address issues that arose among the Galatians regarding whether they needed to adhere to Jewish customs and practices, including circumcision and the observance of certain Jewish festivals. Paul's message was not that The Torah was no longer relevant, but that faith in Yeshua was sufficient for salvation, and that Gentile converts did not need to become Jews and follow Jewish customs to be part of God's people. However, this message did not imply that believers in Yeshua should stop following The Torah, but rather that they should understand its true purpose and not rely on it for salvation. Therefore, the Book of Galatians should be understood as a message to converts written by a Torah-keeping Jew on how to properly live according to The Torah.


[NOTE: The circumcision and Jewish festivals mentioned in this answer are likely not what is commanded in The Torah. In the Jewish Talmud it speaks of a debate about circumcision that extended beyond what is actually commanded in The Torah, which is more likely what Paul was speaking of. Additionally, there were other Jewish festivals and prayer days that went beyond those commanded in The Torah and even beyond the festivals of Purim and Hanukkah that are supported by Scripture. It seems important to bring this up here as this answer may otherwise seem confusing and conflicting with other answers given by the AI program that consistently upheld The Torah as the mandate and expectation of a follower of Yeshua and The Bible.]


QUESTION: If a person does not keep the biblical weekly Sabbath Day, does not celebrate the biblical Feast Days and festivals, does not follow the dietary laws of Leviticus 11 and Deuteronomy 14, chooses to tattoo any part of their body, or in any other way does not follow something given in The Torah for all people to follow should they or should they not be considered someone who follows The Bible and the teachings of Yeshua?


ANSWER: It can be argued that if a person does not keep the biblical weekly Sabbath Day, does not celebrate the biblical Feast Days and festivals, does not follow the dietary laws of Leviticus 11 and Deuteronomy 14, chooses to tattoo any part of their body, or in any other way does not follow something given in The Torah for all people to follow, then they are not fully following the teachings of Yeshua as presented in the Bible. However, it is ultimately up to each individual to decide how they interpret and follow the teachings of the Bible.


You know, that last statement given by the program really does say it all. Having gone through this study, it really is your choice, isn’t it? Are you going to keep following what are clearly the lies of “Christian” religion, or will this convince you that “Christian” religion is completely unbiblical?


The sad part is many “Christians” would read a message like this and see it as an attack on their faith instead of coming to the realization that they have been deceived through their faith and are being given the opportunity to follow the true message of The Bible. This program that I used to prepare this message is just the beginning. This technology will continue to improve and people are going to wake up to the reality that “Christianity” is nothing but a lie concocted by Satan to make people believe they follow The Bible when in reality they oppose The Bible in every possible way.


Many “Christians” hold a view of grace that is against The Torah, saying that because of grace, as they view it, they do not have to follow The Torah. In a different discussion with the program I asked about this and it said: “It is important to note that the concept of grace in the Bible is not presented as an opposition to The Torah, but rather as a supplement to it.” In still other discussions I asked it to tell me how something Yeshua taught, like the Sermon on the Mount, or how the writings of Paul teach against The Torah and that The Torah does not need to be followed. When I asked it such questions it would reply with statements like, “I cannot provide a message that goes against what the Bible teaches,” and, “I cannot develop a message that contradicts or misrepresents the teachings of Yeshua,” going on to say how Yeshua and Paul did not teach against The Torah.


I understand that this is a very hard thing to hear. Much of the time when speaking with “Christians” about these things I am speaking to people who have only known church beliefs their whole life, and often even people who come from families that have been “Christians” for many generations. Sometimes people want to know about their dead grandmother who was “a praying woman who read her Bible every day”. But the truth is the truth, and I’m sorry but your dead relatives are of no concern to the truth. Did you become a “Christian” because you wanted to be part of a religion or because you wanted to find the truth? Can you afford to make excuses or allow emotions to cloud your judgment when the truth is staring you in the face?


The “Christian” religion is not based on The Bible. It uses The Bible, out of context, to validate the unbiblical beliefs it presents. Many other religions today do this as well, including Roman Catholicism, Rabbinic Judaism and modern cults like the Seventh-Day Adventists, the Mormons, and the Jehovah’s Witnesses. These religions appeal to the masses, and The Bible constantly and consistently tells us that those who find the truth will be the few. Are you seeking the truth or are you seeking any of the many social clubs of religion that are hopping and skipping along that broad path that leads to death?


It is up to YOU to decide how you will understand and follow The Bible. Are YOU going to understand it in its proper context and follow the truth, or are you going to carry on with the deceived masses of religion?


Simply put, “Christianity” cannot survive. If there ever was any element of truth in it, it wasn’t the whole truth of the whole Bible. As people gain access to these types of programs and begin to use them, they will have no choice but to admit that they have been lied to and deceived through the “Christian” religion. They will have to face the reality that the message of Scripture from cover to cover upholds The Torah as a mandatory part of true biblical faith and that any real follower of Yeshua and any genuine recipient of The Spirit of God is someone who will be driven to read, study, keep, follow, and live daily by The Torah of God. Anything else is unbiblical.


Blessings and Shalom

©2023 Truth Ignited Ministry





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