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Bible Talk With ChatGPT, Part 1





Bible Talk With ChatGPT 1
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Have you ever used an artificial intelligence program? These are fairly new and some may hold reservations, but there are now AI software and websites available that can aid you in a number of projects. For example, AI art is becoming popular where you can give the program a series of instructions and it will generate a picture of what you described. The more specific you are in your description, the more likely you will be to get what you envision. Also, you are able to continue giving instructions to have the program tweak your picture and bring it closer to how you are imagining it. Some people have come up with some very interesting depictions of things described in The Bible simply by asking these programs to generate a picture based on what a particular passage of Scripture says.


In a similar manner there are now AI programs that you can have a dialogue with. These can be useful for researching a particular topic. For one thing, you can ask it for resources and it will provide you with some options. So, for example, let’s say you were studying the migration pattern of Monarch butterflies. You can ask the program to provide you with some academic resources for this and it will give you several books, most likely scholarly writings by real scientists in that field, and from there you can locate those books at a library to review them for your research project.


In addition to this, these programs are able to review such documents as The Bible and answer questions about them. Now, I have found that it’s important to be specific and set certain rules for the program before asking your questions, and also that you want to be as specific as you can in certain cases. This is because these programs have access to a lot of information. So, if you want the program to answer you based on what The Bible says and not what Christian and/or Jewish religion as a whole says regarding your question, you need to make it clear to the program that you want your answers to be based only on what The Bible says. Otherwise it may use modern religious interpretations of a passage of Scripture to formulate an answer that isn’t quite what you are looking for.


At the recommendation of a friend I decided to play around with one of these programs called ChatGPT, which was launched in November 2022 and has been given good reviews. For the most part, I prefaced my questions to the AI program with statements like: Using only The Bible, considering that the writers of The Bible were Israelites who lived by The Torah, eliminating opinions and interpretations from sources outside of The Bible. To avoid redundancy I have, for the most part, redacted these statements for this study and am only offering the actual questions. In addition, in some cases I have redacted portions of answers that referred to extrabiblical opinions and interpretations. The purpose of this study is to seek what The Bible says, not what Jewish or Christian religion has said. I simply wanted to know how a computer program capable of evaluating the text of The Bible in context and without the preconceived beliefs of Christians or Jews would answer these basic questions. So, where it did offer, after answering my question, how some groups interpret a passage of Scripture is not relevant to this study.


I asked it about some of the major issues that most “Christians” today are opposed to following from The Bible: the food laws from Leviticus 11, The Sabbath Day, and the Feast Days from Leviticus 23. I also asked it about such things as the belief that The Torah is divided into “moral, civil, and ceremonial” categories and the origins of the Christian belief that The Torah no longer applies. I want to share with you some of the questions and answers I got from this program, that once again is answering based strictly on the question asked without religious bias. You know, because if I asked these same questions to “Christians”, even if I said they can only base their answers on The Bible, they have been conditioned to believe certain passages of Scripture say things that they don’t actually says.


Let me also clarify that AI programs like ChatGPT are not demonic, deceptive, or the mark of the beast. Is it possible that an AI program could be any of those? Sure. I wouldn’t rule that out. But Internet search engines are a form of AI. GPS is a form of AI. These things are not evil and they help us with daily tasks. The same is true of a program capable of searching for answers to questions about a chosen topic, like The Bible. So I would ask that nobody gets goofy or starts throwing around wild conspiracy theories about AI programs, as AI is a very broad concept that can apply to a wide variety of tools. Also, most people with conspiracy theory type concerns about this are actually concerned with AGI, which is different than the general topic of AI.


I also want to note that I am preparing this message based on my discussion with the program in two segments. In the first I will look at some of the questions I asked in my initial interaction with the program, the answers I was given, and then a conclusion I draw from that interaction. The second part of this message is much more targeted. While some of the questions from my initial discussion will be repeated, in the second conversation I set a series of hermeneutical rules, not to try manipulating answers but to ensure that the answers were based solely on what The Bible says. This portion of this message will give the rules I provided to the program, the questions, and the answers, with some final thoughts I will close with. So, let’s begin.


Yeshua And The Torah



QUESTION: Was Yeshua (Jesus) a Jewish Rabbi who taught people to follow The Torah as it was given to Moses or was Yeshua a Christian pastor who taught that we do not have to follow The Torah anymore?


ANSWER: According to the Bible, Yeshua was a Jewish Rabbi who was born and lived within the context of Judaism. He affirmed the authority of The Torah and the Jewish Scriptures (Matthew 5:17-18), and his teachings were often grounded in them. In The Gospels, Yeshua is depicted as regularly attending the synagogue and the Temple, and he engaged in debates with other Jewish religious leaders about how to interpret The Torah.


While some of Yeshua’s teachings and actions challenged the interpretations of The Torah that were common in his time, he did not teach that The Torah itself should be abandoned. Rather, he sought to return to the original intentions and spirit of The Torah, which he believed had been distorted by the religious leaders of his time.


It was only after Yeshua’s death and resurrection that his followers began to develop a distinct religious identity that came to be known as Christianity. While Yeshua’s teachings and example continued to be important for his followers, they also came to understand Him as the promised Messiah and Son of God, and they began to develop new practices and beliefs that distinguished them from other Jews.


MY CONCLUSION: It seems very clear based on this response that Yeshua should be seen as a Jewish Rabbi who lived by The Torah and taught His followers to do the same. As such, a true follower of Yeshua, the promised Messiah, will also be a follower of The Torah.


The Authors Of The Bible



QUESTION: Isn't it true that all of the writers of The Bible with only the possible exceptions of Luke and Job were Israelites, and there are some indications that Luke was also an Israelite?


ANSWER: It is generally believed that the authors of most books in the Bible were Israelites, with the possible exceptions of Luke, who was likely a Gentile (non-Jewish) and the author of the book of Job, whose identity is uncertain. However, it is worth noting that some scholars have suggested that the authors of certain books may have been from other backgrounds, such as the author of the book of Esther, who may have been Persian.


QUESTION: Looking only at the recorded statements of Yeshua from The Bible and nothing else, using the fact that Yeshua was a Jewish Rabbi who lived according to The Torah as a primary point of context, would you conclude that anything He taught means that His followers do not have to follow the Torah dietary laws, keep The Sabbath Day, or celebrate the annual Feast Days?


ANSWER: It would not be reasonable to conclude that Yeshua taught that His followers do not have to follow the Torah dietary laws, keep The Sabbath Day, or celebrate the annual Feast Days. In fact, Yeshua stated in Matthew 5:17-19, "Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them. For truly, I say to you, until heaven and earth pass away, not an iota, not a dot, will pass from the Law until all is accomplished. Therefore whoever relaxes one of the least of these commandments and teaches others to do the same will be called least in the kingdom of heaven, but whoever does them and teaches them will be called great in the kingdom of heaven."


Additionally, Yeshua and His disciples were observed keeping The Sabbath and participating in the annual Jewish Feasts, as recorded in the New Testament. Therefore, based solely on the recorded statements and actions of Yeshua, it would be reasonable to conclude that His followers are expected to follow the Torah dietary laws, keep The Sabbath Day, and celebrate the annual Feasts.


MY CONCLUSION: The authors of The Bible were at least mostly Israelites, and I would contend that there are good arguments to be made that Job and Luke were also in this category. If Luke was not a native Israelite, he was at least clearly a convert to a Torah-positive faith as all of the other “New Testament” writers were Torah-keeping Israelites. Also, it is again clear that a true follower of Yeshua lives according to The Torah, including obedience to such things as the food laws, Sabbath, and Feast Days, despite most “Christians” believing that these things are not necessary or no longer applicable elements of faith.


Moral, Civil, Ceremonial Laws



QUESTION: Does The Bible divide The Torah into "moral, civil, and ceremonial" categories, define or classify which commandments would belong in each category, and then state that those commandments in the ceremonial and possibly the civil categories do not need to be followed after the resurrection of Yeshua?


ANSWER: No, The Bible does not explicitly divide The Torah into "moral, civil, and ceremonial" categories, define or classify which commandments belong in each category, and state that those commandments in the ceremonial and possibly the civil categories do not need to be followed after the resurrection of Yeshua. This is a theological construct and interpretative framework that has been developed by some Christian theologians and scholars. However, it is not a concept that is explicitly stated in The Bible.


MY CONCLUSION: The AI program clearly states that The Bible does not support the idea that there is are categories of moral, civil, and ceremonial laws within The Torah. In further discussing the matter it attributes the origins to such categories to writers as early as Origen and Augustine, while also stating that the Jewish theologian Maimonides may be the first to give these three specific categories. It did, however, point out that the full idea that The Torah is divided into these three categories and that the alleged civil and ceremonial commandments are not binding on Christians originates with John Calvin. This would mean that earlier theories about these or similar categories were likely not intended to deem any portions of The Torah obsolete and that such an extreme view is very modern. It is also worth noting that some leading Bible scholars like Dr. Daniel Block, Dr. R.T. France, Dr. Walter Kaiser, Dr. William Barrick, Dr. Mark W. Karlberg, and Dr. J. Daniel Hays note that these alleged categories of “moral, civil, ceremonial laws” are not at all based on anything said in The Bible.


The Food Laws



QUESTION: Is there anything in The Bible that clearly says the dietary laws of Leviticus 11 no longer need to be followed?


ANSWER: There is no clear statement or commandment in the Bible that says the dietary laws of Leviticus 11 are no longer applicable. In fact, Yeshua himself affirmed the authority of the Old Testament Law and the Prophets in Matthew 5:17-19, saying, "Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them. For truly I tell you, until heaven and earth disappear, not the smallest letter, not the least stroke of a pen, will by any means disappear from the Law until everything is accomplished. Therefore anyone who sets aside one of the least of these commands and teaches others accordingly will be called least in the kingdom of heaven, but whoever practices and teaches these commands will be called great in the kingdom of heaven."


Furthermore, in Acts 10, Peter has a vision of a sheet containing all kinds of animals, including those that were considered unclean under the dietary laws of Leviticus 11. However, the vision was not about declaring all foods clean, but rather, it was a lesson for Peter that he should not call any person unclean or impure, even if they are Gentiles.


So, based on the Bible alone, there is no clear indication that the dietary laws of Leviticus 11 are no longer valid. While there are some passages that are often interpreted as implying a change, such as Mark 7:19 and Acts 10, these are not clear statements or commandments that overturn the dietary laws.


QUESTION: Isn't it true, however, that Mark 7, as well as the parallel passage in Matthew 15, has absolutely nothing to do with the Leviticus 11 dietary laws since the matter being addressed was whether or not it is acceptable to eat bread without first performing a Jewish hand washing ritual?


ANSWER: You are correct that the context of Mark 7 and Matthew 15 is not specifically about the dietary laws in Leviticus 11. The passage is about the traditions of the elders and how they had added additional laws and regulations to The Torah that were not commanded by God. Yeshua was criticizing the Pharisees and scribes for placing more emphasis on their man-made traditions than on the commandments of God.


However, some Christians interpret this passage as evidence that Yeshua was declaring all foods clean and that the dietary laws of Leviticus 11 no longer apply. They argue that Yeshua was declaring that what defiles a person is not what goes into their mouth, but what comes out of their heart.


Nevertheless, it's important to note that this interpretation is a matter of debate among scholars and theologians, and it is not a clear and explicit statement in the Bible that the dietary laws of Leviticus 11 no longer apply.


QUESTION: When it says in Mark 7:19 that Yeshua declared all foods clean, isn't it true that He was talking in the context of eating bread without washing your hands first and not about the Torah dietary laws?


ANSWER: Yes, that is correct. In Mark 7:19, Yeshua declares all foods clean, but this statement was made in the context of the Jewish tradition of washing hands before eating bread. The Pharisees were criticizing Yeshua’s disciples for not following this tradition, and Yeshua responded by pointing out that it is not what goes into a person's body that defiles them, but what comes out of their heart. This statement was not about the dietary laws of The Torah, which are still upheld by many Jews and some Christians.


QUESTION: Are there any statements in The Bible you would still feel are saying that the dietary laws are no longer applicable following the resurrection of Yeshua?


ANSWER: There are no statements in the Bible that directly and clearly state that the dietary laws of Leviticus 11 are no longer applicable following the resurrection of Yeshua.


MY CONCLUSION: It is very clear that the program sees nothing in Scripture that actually deems the Leviticus 11 food laws to be voided. It notes that there are Christians who interpret certain passages differently, and that is a discussion beyond the scope of this message. What is important to note is that The Bible does not clearly support this popular belief that the food laws are not binding on Christians who claim to be followers of Yeshua. Also, as noted earlier, if we go by everything The Bible says we will come to the logical conclusion that a follower of Yeshua is expected to follow these Torah food laws.


The Sabbath Day



QUESTION: Is there any way to justify a change to The Sabbath, either naming Sunday to be a new Sabbath or that The Sabbath is no longer required?


ANSWER: No, there is no clear Biblical justification for changing the Sabbath from the seventh day of the week to another day, or for no longer requiring the observance of the Sabbath. The Sabbath is clearly established in the Ten Commandments, which are considered by many Christians to be the foundation of God's moral law. In Exodus 20:8-11, God commands His people to remember and keep the Sabbath day holy. In addition, throughout the Old and New Testaments, there are numerous examples of the Sabbath being observed by God's people.


There are some passages in the New Testament, such as Colossians 2:16-17 and Romans 14:5-6, that some Christians interpret as indicating that the Sabbath is no longer required. However, these passages are subject to varying interpretations and are not clear and explicit commands to disregard the Sabbath. Therefore, it is difficult to justify a change to the Sabbath based solely on the Bible.


MY CONCLUSION: Once again when we go by what The Bible clearly says and nothing else, The Sabbath Day as defined in Scripture continues to be a mandated part of biblical faith and a true follower of Yeshua is expected to keep it.


Passover And Communion



QUESTION: When Yeshua was celebrating Passover with His disciples He said "Do this in memory of Me". Based just on what is said in The Bible and nothing else, would it be more reasonable to conclude that He was telling His followers to celebrate Passover every year, according to the Hebrew calendar on the 14th of Nisan, in His memory or that He was creating a new ritual that would become known as "eucharist" or "communion"?


ANSWER: Based solely on what is said in the Bible, it would be reasonable to conclude that Yeshua was instructing His followers to celebrate Passover in His memory, as He was celebrating the Passover meal with them at the time. There is no mention in the Bible of Yeshua creating a new ritual called "eucharist" or "communion" during this specific meal. However, it is possible that over time, the practice of celebrating Passover in remembrance of Yeshua evolved into what is now commonly known as the Christian ritual of communion or the Lord's Supper.


MY CONCLUSION: Yeshua was telling us to keep the biblical celebration of Passover in His memory. This is further supported by the words of Paul in 1 Corinthians 5:7-8. The ritual of “communion” or “eucharist” is not biblical in origin and is not what Yeshua or any other “New Testament” writer would have referred to. In fact, it seems as though the “communion” ritual is rooted more heavily in a ritual of the ancient Greek mystery cults and was appropriated to ultimately replace the full celebration of Passover. A true follower of Yeshua will keep Passover, just as they would any of the other Feast Days, and will not engage in a ritual that is rooted in something like the Greek mystery cults.


Christian Abandonment Of The Torah



QUESTION: If we use as a rule that the entire New Testament is misunderstood by some Christians and it promotes a belief in following The Torah, just as Yeshua taught, what would be the earliest definitive writings by Christians after the New Testament period that express a view that Christians no longer have to follow The Torah?


ANSWER: The earliest definitive writings by Christians after the New Testament period that express a view that Christians no longer have to follow The Torah are found in the works of Marcion of Sinope, a Christian leader who lived in the 2nd century CE. Marcion believed that the God of the Old Testament, who gave The Torah, was a different deity than the God of the New Testament, who sent Yeshua. Marcion rejected the Hebrew Bible and most of the New Testament, except for a heavily edited version of the Gospel of Luke and some of the letters of Paul. He taught that Christians were not bound by the laws and commandments of The Torah, which he saw as the teachings of an inferior and false God. Marcion's teachings were widely condemned by the early Christian Church as heretical, and his followers were eventually expelled from the Church. However, his ideas had a significant impact on the development of Christian theology and the formation of the Christian canon.


MY CONCLUSION: It’s very simple, the idea that “Christians” do not have to live by The Torah does not originate in The Bible, it originates with a second century heretic. Anyone who believes that The Torah, whether in whole or in part, is abolished and no longer applies to followers of Yeshua has built their faith on one of the biggest heretics in history instead of The Bible.


Torah As An Act Of Worship



QUESTION: Would The Bible define Torah-keeping as an act of worshiping God?


ANSWER: Yes, according to the Bible, keeping The Torah can be considered an act of worshiping God. In Romans 12:1, the apostle Paul urges believers to offer their bodies as living sacrifices, holy and pleasing to God, as an act of worship. One way to offer one's body as a living sacrifice is to obey God's commandments, including those found in The Torah. In Psalm 119, the longest chapter in the Bible, the psalmist repeatedly expresses his love for and commitment to God's Law (The Torah), indicating that keeping The Torah is an act of worship and devotion to God. Additionally, in Deuteronomy 10:12-13, Moses instructs the Israelites to fear God, walk in His ways, love Him, serve Him with all their heart and soul, and keep His commandments and statutes, which are contained in The Torah.


MY CONCLUSION: When most people think about worship they picture things like singing songs, dancing, or lifting their hands. But Yeshua said that we must worship in spirit and in truth, and Psalm 119:142 tells us that The Torah is truth. It’s interesting how this computer program referred to Psalm 119 and we have it right here in this same Psalm stating that The Torah is truth. You cannot truly worship God in a biblical sense unless you live by The Torah of God.


True And False Prophets



QUESTION: How would The Bible explain what a prophet is?


ANSWER: According to the Bible, a prophet is someone who receives direct revelation from God and speaks that message to others. In the Old Testament, prophets were often sent to convey God's will to the Israelites and warn them of the consequences of disobedience. The prophets were sometimes also given visions of future events and messianic prophecies.


In Deuteronomy 18:18-19, Moses says, "I will raise up for them a prophet like you from among their fellow Israelites, and I will put my words in his mouth. He will tell them everything I command him. I myself will call to account anyone who does not listen to my words that the prophet speaks in my name."


In the New Testament, Yeshua is often referred to as a prophet, and there are also references to prophets in the early Christian church. In 1 Corinthians 14, Paul discusses the use of prophecy in the church and encourages believers to eagerly desire the gift of prophecy so that they may edify and encourage one another.


Overall, a prophet is someone who speaks on behalf of God and conveys His message to others.


QUESTION: To follow on that, how would The Bible describe what a false prophet is?


ANSWER: According to the Bible, a false prophet is someone who claims to speak for God but speaks lies or leads people away from the truth. In Deuteronomy 18:20-22, it says:


"But the prophet who presumes to speak a word in my name that I have not commanded him to speak, or who speaks in the name of other gods, that same prophet shall die.’ And if you say in your heart, ‘How may we know the word that the Lord has not spoken?’— when a prophet speaks in the name of the Lord, if the word does not come to pass or come true, that is a word that the Lord has not spoken; the prophet has spoken it presumptuously. You need not be afraid of him."


In other words, a false prophet is one who speaks in God's name but says things that do not come true or teaches things that contradict the truth of God's word. False prophets are dangerous because they can lead people astray from the truth and ultimately away from God.


QUESTION: Deuteronomy 13 also indicates that a false prophet is someone who teaches against The Torah of God and that people should not listen to a false prophet. Also, you used a more generic term of "truth" to say that a false prophet leads people away from truth. Psalm 119:142 says that The Torah is truth. Would you then concur that according to The Bible anyone who teaches against following The Torah is a false prophet according to The Bible?


ANSWER: Deuteronomy 13 does state that a prophet who teaches against The Torah of God is a false prophet and that people should not listen to them. Additionally, Psalm 119:142 does describe The Torah as truth. Therefore, it can be inferred from these passages that anyone who teaches against following The Torah is a false prophet according to the Bible. However, it is important to note that this is one aspect of what makes a false prophet, and there may be other factors that contribute to a person being labeled as such.


QUESTION: It is correct that there are other factors that can label someone as a false prophet, but based on Deuteronomy 13, Psalm 119:142, and everything else The Bible says regarding what a true prophet is, can we say that according to The Bible anyone and everyone who teaches against following The Torah is a false prophet on that point alone?


ANSWER: Based on Deuteronomy 13 and Psalm 119:142, it can be concluded that anyone who teaches against following The Torah is a false prophet according to the Bible on that point alone. However, it is important to note that there may be other factors that come into play in identifying a false prophet, as mentioned in other parts of the Bible.


MY CONCLUSION: A true prophet tells you to follow The Torah and a false prophet is anyone who teaches against following The Torah. While other things may qualify someone as a false prophet, such as predicting things that do not come true, and such a person may even hold a generally Torah-positive theology, it is important to note that everyone who teaches against The Torah is a false prophet. This would mean that practically all mainstream “Christian” pastors and teachers, who tell people that at least some parts of The Torah do not apply today, qualify as false prophets that we are not to listen to. This is simply what God told us. Anytime anyone says anything against The Torah, don’t listen to them.


These answers should be very enlightening to anyone who genuinely wants to follow Yeshua and The Bible. This is a program that is at least a lot less bias than a religious person. We can come to a logical conclusion that The Torah is still the expected way of life for a new covenant Believer who follows the true biblical Yeshua.


Something else I want to mention briefly before closing out this first part of this teaching is that I asked this computer program to develop for me a message on how the famed “sermon on the mount” teaches obedience to The Torah. It provided me with two pages of content. Then I asked it to develop a message about how the “sermon on the mount” teaches that we no longer have to follow The Torah as a follower of Yeshua. This is where things got interesting—it refused to do this and said that as an AI language model it is not capable of developing a message on the “sermon on the mount” that would go against The Bible, The Torah, and the teachings of Yeshua. This should be a real eye-opener to all “Christian” antinomians that a computer program with all of these capabilities is not able to teach what they teach because it’s not the truth.


And that’s where I will end this first part of this teaching. In the next part of this little “experiment” I will take a slightly different approach with the program, giving it a list of specific rules. In doing that, you will see that the answers are similar but much more definitive and will really solidify that what popular “Christianity” teaches simply is not the truth.


Blessings and Shalom

©2023 Truth Ignited Ministry





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